Technology

Stanford Medicine 25 Blog

  • The Internet: The Elephant in the Examination Room

    Peter Conrad, a sociologist at Brandeis University, spoke of the rise and fall of the medical authority in the doctor patient office encounter in his many scholarly articles. With the internet becoming the “elephant in the doctor’s office,” the dynamic of medical authority has certainly changed…

  • The History of Bedside Ultrasound: From Submarines to Sub-Interns

    Among the myriad of modern diagnostic tools, few can claim the certainty, consistency, and intimacy of ultrasound. In contrast to other dominant types of medical imaging characterized by large, foreign machines and uncomfortable noise and positioning, this sound-based imaging technique is one of the least intimidating and widely-used exam method, applied in fields ranging from Pulmonology and Gastroenterology to Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  • Finding Joy in Physical Exam Skills

    In an interview with hospitalist, Twitter personality and “Incident Report” host Zubin Damania, Abraham Verghese discusses the movement to bring physicians back to the bedside.

  • As Prices Drop, Point-of-Care Ultrasound May Spark Evolution of Physical Exam

    In a commentary for JAMA Cardiology, John Kugler writes, “The ‘wow’ factor is powerful with the latest generation of pocket ultrasound machines.

  • The 4th Annual Stanford 25 Bedside Teaching Symposium

    On September 7 and 8, Stanford 25 hosted its 4th Annual Bedside Teaching Symposium, an event that brings together medical educators from around the world to foster clinical teaching skills.

  • Empathy and the Physical Exam Remain Essential Components of Medicine

    A recent article in Quartz says that while machine-learning technology is becoming more “pervasive in the health system,” empathy may be becoming obsolete… even though “it’s one of the reasons why people trust doctors."…

  • Teaching the “Intangibles” of Medicine

    An editorial on Healio.com highlights the importance of “intangibles” in medicine, primarily the connection between patient and provider. In the commentary, Leonard H. Calabrese, a rheumatologist and course director at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, shares concern that empathy and mindfulness are pieces of medicine “we know very little about.”…

  • AI is Doing More to Help Keep Doctors at the Bedside

    Prompted by the release of Sense.ly’s “Molly,” a new artificial intelligence (AI)-powered avatar, a Forbes article examined “how humans and machines can work together to improve and transform” health care.

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