Stanford Medicine 25 Blog

  • Register Now for the 4th Annual Bedside Teaching Symposium

    This year, the 4th annual Stanford 25 Bedside Teaching Symposium will take place on September 7 and 8, 2018. Registration is now open!…

  • UMKC Case Highlights the Importance of a Thorough Physical Exam

    A recent case presented by the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Missouri Kansas City (UMKC) demonstrates the importance of physical exam skills and provides a clear example that lack of thorough history and complete physical exam can lead to diagnostic errors.

  • The Benefits of Bringing Doctors Back to the Bedside

    The first two episodes of a new podcast from Johns Hopkins Medicine focus on “bringing doctors back to the bedside,” and both feature members of the Society of Bedside Medicine, where Stanford Medicine 25’s Abraham Verghese serves as an Advisory Council member.

  • Bedside Medicine Training Helps Both New and Established Physicians

    A recent blog post on the Daily Nurse highlights the different ways nursing students, medical students and residents are being taught good bedside manner. This training builds clinicians’ communications skills and offers real-life experience.

  • Artificial Intelligence as a Partner in Patient Care

    Abraham Verghese and fellow Department of Medicine faculty Nigam Shah and Robert Harrington have authored an opinion piece on humanism and artificial intelligence which insists that “the two cultures – computer and the physician – must work together.”…

  • Physical Exam Can Sort Out - And Treat - Common Type of Vertigo

    Some older patients with dizziness undergo thousands of dollars of tests that often turn up nothing. Others are told it’s just a part of aging. But with the most common kind of vertigo, there’s actually an easy fix.

  • The Spine Sign

    Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) has a sensitivity and specificity for pleural effusions of 93% and out performs chest x-ray in detecting and characterizing pleural effusions. Using POCUS physicians are able to detect as little as 5ml of pleural fluid.

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