Stanford Medicine 25 Blog

  • Compassion, Patience and Bedside Manner Improve Patient Satisfaction

    A study from Healthgrades and Medical Group Management Association (MGMA) analyzed seven million patient reviews and comments about health care providers. This Patient Sentiment Report found that over 52 percent of patients stated that they wanted their doctor to have at least one of the following qualities: compassion, comfort, patience, personality and bedside manner.

  • Technology Doesn’t Have to Be the Antithesis of Humanity

    In a commentary for Modern Healthcare, North Carolina physician Chris DeRienzo asks a question that we’ve also been exploring with great interest and passion: “Could technology actually return some humanity to healthcare?” DeRienzo believes it can, and we agree, of course.

  • The Miracle of a Patient’s Recovery

    If it was a movie script, you wouldn’t believe it. A 28-year-old woman has a miscarriage while on vacation in Mexico. When she goes to the doctor, a nightmare begins. She ends up spending the next five years in and out of hospitals. At one point, she’s told she’s going to die. She takes chemotherapy, sees a naturopath, sees doctors in her native Ukiah and at Stanford, even goes to Philadelphia and Boston to see experts on the disease. They all agree that nothing can be done.

  • The Tradition of Daily Bedside Clinical Care

    Brian Garibaldi, co-president of the Society of Bedside Medicine and contributor to Stanford Bedside Teaching Symposium, and his colleagues at Johns Hopkins University (JHU) are reinvigorating beside medicine in the university’s residency training program.

  • Abraham Verghese Shares Story of the EHR’s Negative Consequences With Broader Audience

    In a recent feature piece for The New York Times, Abraham Verghese, MD, MACP addresses “the threat that electronic health records (EHRs) and machine learning pose to physicians’ clinical judgment – and their well-being.”…

  • The Basics vs. Technology Debate: When They Work Together, Everyone Wins

    A recent discussion on Medscape between two physicians posed the question, “Are Physicians--Let's Face It--Getting Clinically Lazy?” This bold question has prompted many responses from clinicians that has become an ongoing conversation on “The Basics Versus Technology: Which Wins?”…

  • Using Art to Teach the Human Side of Medicine

    In Spokane’s Providence Internal Medicine Residency rotation, students and residents study more than patient charts. Each morning, reports The Spokesman-Review, they also gather to chat briefly about a painting, image, piece of music or poem that one of them has brought in for discussion.

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