2018 Archive

Stanford Medicine 25 Blog

  • Artificial Intelligence as a Partner in Patient Care

    Abraham Verghese and fellow Department of Medicine faculty Nigam Shah and Robert Harrington have authored an opinion piece on humanism and artificial intelligence which insists that “the two cultures – computer and the physician – must work together.”…

  • Physical Exam Can Sort Out - And Treat - Common Type of Vertigo

    Some older patients with dizziness undergo thousands of dollars of tests that often turn up nothing. Others are told it’s just a part of aging. But with the most common kind of vertigo, there’s actually an easy fix.

  • What Stands in the Way of Bedside Teaching?

    An opinion piece from The BMJ made the rounds a while ago on Twitter. The column, provocatively titled “The death of bedside teaching,” originally appeared in December 2016, but the points made by physician Mark Mikhail continue to reverberate. Is bedside teaching really dying?…

  • An Emphasis on the Bedside May Prevent Physician Burnout

    Physician burnout is a very real job hazard. However, according to a 2016 article in Consumer Affairs, “being present and mindful” with patients may be able to prevent burnout.

  • The Spine Sign

    Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) has a sensitivity and specificity for pleural effusions of 93% and out performs chest x-ray in detecting and characterizing pleural effusions. Using POCUS physicians are able to detect as little as 5ml of pleural fluid.

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