Perspective

Stanford Medicine 25 Blog

  • Abraham Verghese Asks: Why Are We Doing This Teaching?

    We teach bedside medicine. We emphasize the importance of the physical exam and how it can help care for your patient and also create an environment where the person you are caring for develops trust. We have taught this now for over 6 years (when the Stanford Medicine 25 was first created). But sometimes it’s important to ask why. In a recent blog post, “Will the Healing Touch Go Out the Door With the Stethoscope?”, we look at the how some think that ultrasound is replacing any need for a stethoscope...

  • Will the Healing Touch Go Out the Door With the Stethoscope?

    We teach bedside medicine. We emphasize the importance of the physical exam and how it can help care for your patient and also create an environment where the person you are caring for develops trust. We have taught this now for over 6 years (when the Stanford Medicine 25 was first created). But sometimes it’s important to ask why. In a recent blog post, “Will the Healing Touch Go Out the Door With the Stethoscope?”, we look at the how some think that ultrasound is replacing any need for a stethoscope...

  • Every Patient Has a Story Worth Hearing

    Earlier this year, Canadian newspaper The Globe and Mail commemorated the anniversary of the death of neurologist Oliver Sacks by taking a look at his legacy. The piece, by author Norman Doidge, aptly reminds us that “the world’s most famous neurologist believed that every patient had a story worth hearing.” And indeed, his work proves...

  • What will bedside manner look like for new data-driven physicians?

    Earlier this year, Managed Care magazine published a cover story on young doctors. Praising them for their ability to collaborate, their openness to measurement and consciousness related to cost-effective care, the article advanced the idea that these “newly minted” physicians are just what health care needs. However, it had one main question: “How well will...

  • An Image For A Day

    This interesting image raises all sorts of questions. What was Frida trying to say? Was it a comment about presence or about lack thereof? Was it a way of sanctifying the doctor? We know he operated on her many times and she thought he had saved her life. What does this evoke for you? What other observations might you make as an art critic and medical person?…

  • Slow Medicine And Fast Medicine

    As we watch medicine unfold, there is a lovely debate emerging around slow versus fast medicine. It would seem that emphasis on the bedside falls very much in the category of the former.

  • The Internet: The Elephant in the Examination Room

    Peter Conrad, a sociologist at Brandeis University, spoke of the rise and fall of the medical authority in the doctor patient office encounter in his many scholarly articles. With the internet becoming the “elephant in the doctor’s office,” the dynamic of medical authority has certainly changed…

  • Interview with Dr. Eric Topol (editor-in-chief of Medscape)

    The editor-in-chief of Medscape, Dr. Eric Topol, visited Stanford to sit down and do an interview with our Dr. Vergese for the Medscape One-on-One online video series.

  • What Can Doctors Learn from Narrative Medicine?

    Patient-centered care is an important aspect of the National Strategy for Quality Improvement on Health Care. As such, healthcare institutions are strongly focusing on the patient-physician relationship and the patient experience.

  • The Flipped Patient

    Many of us in the Program in Bedside Medicine are deeply involved in the medical students pre-clerkship curriculum. Each week the students interview hospitalized patients, perform physical exams, give presentations, followed by a written H&P note. These students enter the patient room with only pen and paper, as they have not yet gained access to the Electronic Health Record (EHR). By the end of the year, our students are able to obtain medical history from patients with complex medical problems on their own and able to communicate their findings concisely and effectively.

  • Clinical Medicine Article by Dr. Andy Elder

    A member of our Stanford 25 team, Dr. Andy Elder, recently published his thoughts about his visiting professorship to Stanford last year.

  • Teaching Humility at the Bedside

    Humility is an underappreciated skill in a time of global budgets, evidenced based approaches, and cost-containment. The bright, well-read, talented medical students who may lack humility are not uncommon.

  • Abraham Verghese Interviews Jerome Kassirer on New Book

    In a career that spans more than five decades, Jerome P. Kassirer, M.D. has been an acclaimed kidney specialist, clinical researcher, administrator, author, creator of new medical disciplines and, during the decade of the 1990s, editor-in-chief of the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine.

  • Can Improv Help Doctors Connect With Patients?

    Writing for The Atlantic last summer, Anu Atluru, MD, lamented the depersonalization that can happen in medical training and offered an alternative to the current script. It was improv.

  • Conversation About Bedside Medicine Gains Momentum

    Abraham Verghese’s passion for patient care and physician wellbeing is contagious. It’s also attracting national attention, as with this recent Medscape article: Abraham Verghese: ‘Revolution’ Starts at Bedside.

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